What Course Should I Take?

Hazmat & Waste Courses Made Simple

While most people in the safety world know of the OSHA and Cal-OSHA regulation known as the HAZWOPER regulation, we find that many do not fully understand what it actually requires and how to apply it to various types of operations.

While this may not seem like a big deal, the consequences of not certifying employees to do the types of work that you want them to perform can be both dangerous and costly. And then you add in the regulations for DOT HazMat Employee and EPA’s requirements for Waste Handlers. It’s easy to get confused!

Safety Compliance Management makes your safety solutions simple, and that includes our training classes. Following is a short summary with a little information about the classes, who needs to take which class, and when they are offered at Safety Compliance Management.

HAZWOPER Training

DOT HAZMAT Training

Hazardous Waste Training (EPA)

HAZWOPER Training

HAZWOPER stands for Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response. The regulation actually includes 3 distinct types of operations and outlines 9 levels of certification within those 3 types of operations. The regulation is found in 29 CFR, Part 1910.120 in the Federal OSHA system, and in 8 CCR, Section 5192 in California regulations. While slightly different, each of the regulations apply to these 3 types of operations found in sections (a) of both the Federal and State versions.

Waste Site Cleanup Personnel

This worker training is based on activities involving hazardous waste cleanup. The regulations define the first group as those involved in:

  • Clean up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local or other, involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites
  • Corrective actions involving clean up operations at sites covered by RCRA
  • Voluntary clean up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local or other governmental bodies as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites

So, if you’re working at a recognized hazardous waste site where clean-up operations are being performed, then this applies to you!

General Site Workers

OSHA requires that these workers have 40 hours classroom training plus 3 days of documented field experience. General site workers are those who are generally at the site and whose job responsibilities place them in possible contact with hazardous waste above the Permissible Exposure Limits (PEL) established by OSHA. They may wear the various levels of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and engage in activities that are moderately to highly hazardous.

Who needs to take this training?

  • People who work at a hazardous waste clean up site on a frequent basis, such as an equipment operator or laborer
  • Corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
  • People who regularly work with, or clean up hazardous materials or wastes with a potential for exposures above “permissible” levels, and might be required to use respiratory protection in the course of that work

So, if you’re working at a recognized hazardous waste site where clean-up operations are being performed, then this training is for you!

Occasional Site Workers

OSHA requires that Occasional Site Workers have 24 hours of classroom training plus 1 day of documented field experience. Occasional site workers are those whose job responsibilities do not allow exposure to hazardous substances above the Permissible Exposure Limits (PEL). They would not be required to wear respiratory protection, since the need for respiratory protection implies that an exposure level above the PEL is present.

Who needs to take this training?

  • People who work at a hazardous waste clean up site like an engineer or a surveyor
  • People who regularly work with, or clean up hazardous materials or wastes with exposures within “permissible” levels and are not required to use respiratory protection

Crossover Module

OSHA requires an additional 16 hours of classroom training plus 2 additional documented days of field experience for those whose job requirements have changed. They were trained as a 24 hour Occasional Site Worker, but now have or will have the potential to be exposed above permissible exposure limits as a General Site Worker.

HAZWOPER Refresher

OSHA requires that all Site Workers, whether General or Occasional, receive 8 hours of Refresher training annually.

DOT HAZMAT Training

Do you have a job that puts you in contact with hazardous materials that are transported in any way? This is the course for you. The United States Department of Transportation (DOT) has a series of regulations for training programs for Hazmat Employees. It is sometimes referred to as

HM-181 or HM-126 training. Often confusing and complicated, this training offers a realistic and understandable way to achieve the certification you need.

DOT HAZMAT EMPLOYEE

This is the certification required for shipping within the US. The training will cover how to work safely with hazardous materials and the basic requirements for DOT Hazmat Employee. This course contains a section with general awareness training regarding hazardous materials security. While the DOT does not have a requirement for the number of hours, this course takes 4 hours to complete.

Who should take this training?

  • A person who prepares hazardous material(s) for transportation, including the shipping/receiving department where chemicals are used, stored, or processed
  • A person involved in the transportation of a hazardous material, such as a truck driver
  • A person who labels or marks packages that are being transported, or signs the shipping papers for packages of hazardous materials to be transported

DOT HAZMAT Employee with IATA

Some shipments must be sent overseas, and frequently this occurs by air. When shipping outside the US by air, certification in International Air Transportation Association (IATA) regulations is required. The full course for DOT and IATA training takes 6 hours to complete.

Who should take this training?

  • A person who labels or marks packages that are being shipped overseas by air
  • A person who signs the shipping papers for packages that are being shipped overseas by air

OSHA requires an additional 16 hours of classroom training plus 2 additional documented days of field experience for those whose job requirements have changed. They were trained as a 24 hour Occasional Site Worker, but now have or will have the potential to be exposed above permissible exposure limits as a General Site Worker.

Hazardous Waste Training (EPA)

The purpose of this training program is to give workers a strong understanding of the hazardous waste regulations and safety considerations that need to be employed by anyone who works with the hazardous waste; and in the process, to meet the regulatory requirements for certification to work with and handle hazardous waste.

The purpose of the regulation is to protect those who handle the material, and the environment where the wastes are stored or treated. The program will meet the requirements of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the California Department of Toxic Substance Control (DTSC).

Hazardous Waste Handler

This training program provides the required knowledge for those employees who work directly with or around hazardous waste by providing information regarding waste handling procedures and emergency action procedures. While the regulations do not have a required number of hours for the training program, it takes 4 hours to complete.

Who should take this training?

  • People who work with, label and store hazardous wastes
  • People who sign manifests for removal of hazardous wastes

Hazardous Waste Handler / DOT HAZMAT Employee

There are times when DOT and EPA requirements blend. When hazardous wastes are transported, or prepared for transportation, or the paperwork for the transport needs to be signed, both certifications are required. Because some of the information is similar, this course only takes 6 hours to complete.

Who should take this course?

  • People who package, load or unload, and transport hazardous wastes
  • People who sign shipping papers and waste manifests

OSHA requires an additional 16 hours of classroom training plus 2 additional documented days of field experience for those whose job requirements have changed. They were trained as a 24 hour Occasional Site Worker, but now have or will have the potential to be exposed above permissible exposure limits as a General Site Worker.

Check out our online training courses

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